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SHARING PERSONAL HISTORIES and compelling narratives

Read these personal histones and learn what happened to so many different individuals and how their lives have been shaped by their journey and experience.

Emmy Golding

Helen Stone’s mother, Emmy Golding, née Kaufmann, was born in a small village near Cologne in Germany just as World War I was beginning.  The twelve Jewish families in her village, who had lived there for many generations, were well integrated and yet maintained their religious identity.  The insidious rise of the Nazis from 1933 onwards forced Emmy, her parents and her sister to flee Germany in search of a safe haven.
Emmy Golding

Helen Stone’s mother, Emmy Golding, née Kaufmann, was born in a small village near Cologne in Germany just as World War I was beginning.  The twelve Jewish families in her village, who had lived there for many generations, were well integrated and yet maintained their religious identity.  The insidious rise of the Nazis from 1933 onwards forced Emmy, her parents and her sister to flee Germany in search of a safe haven.

Emmy has amazing recall and describes her experiences vividly and powerfully on a video recording made by the Spielberg Foundation in 1996. She talks about growing up, school and the local community as well as about her dangerous but successful attempt to smuggle money out of Germany and her confrontation with an SS official in a desperate bid to have her father released from Dachau Concentration Camp.

She escaped to Britain on a domestic service visa in May 1939 and succeeded in rescuing her parents, who arrived in London just three days before the start of war in September 1939.  She married, had children and eventually made a fulfilling life for herself and her family in England.

Helen’s presentation intersperses Emmy’s own testimony with personal memories of her mother. The Spielberg video, family photos and artefacts are combined with brief footage of the rise of the Nazis, thus setting the story against its historical background.

Although this presentation deals with the Holocaust, it does not give details of concentration camp life and ultimately has a positive and uplifting message to convey.  It is therefore considered suitable for young people of thirteen years and upwards.

Credit: Generation 2 Generation